Archive for Rich Lindgren

Top 10 Twitter Accounts to Follow for Bass Fishing

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , , on June 26, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

Twitter got popular by people following the likes of Paris Hilton and Ashton Kutcher, but I think you’ll find it’s a great source for rapid, relevant information and news on the topics you are most interested in.  For me, I am most interested in sports and in particular, bass fishing!

So whether you are a long time tweep or just interested in getting started, here are my Top 10 suggested follows for all things bass fishing.  My criterion is a mix of things, but all of these accounts must tweet regularly, have some longevity and bring interesting tweets to the mix.

BassFanNews@BassFanNews

BassFan covers all things bass fishing, from tournaments, to industry news, record catches and more.

 

Wired2Fish@Wired2Fish

Wired2Fish is similar to BassFan but with more how-tos, tips & tricks, and product reviews.

 

JonesProFishing@JonesProFishing

Alton Jones is a Bassmaster Elites Series pro that connects with his fans through Twitter and Facebook better than most.  He also responds to a great number of tweets and sends out tips via tweets.  As a bonus he keeps you plugged into the Baylor Lady Bears and other Baylor sports.

 

Bass Utopia@BassUtopia

Bass Utopia is the first of its kind, community-driven, bass fishing site that reaches out to its members via all forms of social media–their Twitter account is no different.  They offer truly entertaining videos, monthly big fish photo contests, news, information sharing and much more.

 

Bass Parade@BassParade

BassParade tweets out their daily Bass Blaster which is jam packed with news and original insight on what is happening in bass fishing.  I especially appreciate Jay Kumar’s fresh perspective.

 

BassEast@_BassEast_

Bass EAST works tightly with many BASS & FLW pros to bring you articles, videos, tips and news.

 

TackleTour@TeamTackleTour

Tackle Tour has taken fishing tackle and gear reviews to new levels. Their Twitter feed will help you stay up-to-date with the hottest products in bass fishing.

 

FLW@FLWFishing

FLW Outdoors does an amazing job tweeting during FLW Tour events as they follow pros all around the lakes—giving updates and a true feel for what is happening on the water.  Plus, they keep you posted on tournament results and other FLW related tournament fishing news.  If that is not enough, they tweet reminders for free contests and fantasy fishing.

 

BASS@BASS_Nation

Bassmaster not only tweets on-the-water tournament updates, but they do a great job of connecting with their followers by answering questions and posting member’s bass photos.  Ultimately, BASS is the icon of bass fishing, so how can you not follow them?

 

Jacob Wheeler@WheelerFishing

Jacob Wheeler is one of many FLW pros that do a great job of keeping their fans up to speed on their practice and their travels from venue to venue, but he does it in a fun way!  Plus, he is the reigning Forrest Wood Cup Champ!

 

If you are not on Twitter, maybe now is a time to test the waters, if you already area, then make sure you add these to your follow list.  If you are hungry for more, you can also follow me @HellaBass and @krugerfarms–not to mention the rest of the krugerfarms.com pro team (@Gussy Outdoors, @DustyMinke, @MichaelaFishing, and @BillShimota).  They have tons of info to share on fishing and hunting news and events.

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

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Breaking Down a Texas Rig

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , , on May 29, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

Texas rigging worms and soft plastic baits is one of the oldest and time-tested methods for catching bass in just about any situation–including in and around thick cover.  The Texas rig is a pretty simple rig, in that it usually consists of sliding a traditional bullet weight onto your line before you tying on a standard or offset worm hook. The bait is set by rigging the hook into the head of the bait about a ¼”, poking it back out the side of the body, then turning it 180 degrees, and bringing the point of the hook back into the bait to make it weedless.20130528_221853

Beyond the very basic principle of Texas rigging, there are a lot of subtle differences and tweaks to make a tried-and-true fish catcher into something even better.  When you start to think about it, there are actually a lot of variables when you consider, rod, reel, line, weight and hooks for your setup.

I start almost every Texas rig with a rubber sinker stop threaded on my line before I select a sinker.  These little guys keep my weight next to my bait, make sure I keep contact with my bait at all times, and pull my bait through cover.  You can peg your sinker with a toothpick, but these stops are easier on your line and can be loosened to give your bait a little more freedom.  After the sinker peg, I select a tungsten sinker to match the size of plastic bait and rate of fall I desire for the conditions and application I am facing.  I may go as light as 1/16 oz or heavier than 1 oz, but for basic rigging I usually use 1/8-3/8 oz tungsten slip sinkers.  I always use tungsten weights for the enhanced feel of the bottom and bites; plus I feel the hook-up percentage is better and that they come through cover better than traditional lead sinkers.

Next, I tie on the hook. I typically attach hooks to my 12-17lb fluorocarbon line with a San Diego Jam Knot or Palomar knot.  I find that 2/0 to 4/0 hooks will cover the great majority of my needs for standard soft plastic baits.  I use two styles: Extra Wide Gap (EWG) and Straight Shank Flipping Hooks.  I use an EWG hook when I am casting and dragging tubes, brush hogs, and worms.  I pair a straight shank hook with a heavier sinker for creature baits, like the TriggerX Goo Bug and other bulkier offerings, when I am pitching into thicker cover and fishing the baits in a more vertical manner–I feel it has a more positive hook up in these conditions.

Texas RigsAs far as rod selection, I like 7’ to 7’4” rods that are medium to medium-heavy with moderately fast actions.  I will fish Texas rigs on multiple rods that I own: ranging from my Dobyns Savvy 703C, to my Champion 734C, up to my absolute favorite rod for Texas rigging, the Dobyns Champion Extreme DX744C.  There are a ton of great rods and different price points to choose from, but be sure to get a fairly long rod with good balance, moderate back bone, and good sensitivity.

Keep a few of these suggestions in mind when setting up your Texas rigs and it should help you get a few more fish in the boat!

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

Texas Rigs

A Path to Professional Tournament Bass Angling

Posted in Fishing Tips, FLW Tournaments with tags , , , , , on May 15, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

Many enthusiastic anglers often see professional anglers on television and are intrigued by the potential of fishing as a career path.  At the same time, most people have no idea what it takes to be a professional bass tournament angler.  Beyond the long hours and thousands of miles of travel every year, it is not the easiest profession to break into.  For the major circuits, like FLW Tour and Bassmasters Elite Series, there are qualification requirements.

Fish your Way to the Top

Rich at TBF Tournament

Rich at TBF Tournament

The most important step to take on your way to professional angling is to get out on the water. Along with doing this outside of tournaments, participating as a co-angler in the FLW EverStart, FLW Tour or Opens is a great way to get exposure to new lakes and different fishing techniques from extremely good anglers. But with the reward, you also run the risk of running into a boater that will back boat you—meaning they position the boat in a way that makes it impossible for you to cast to a spot. With this in mind, when you fish as a co-angler you need to go into the tournament just looking to learn something new rather than looking to get the biggest bite.

For each tour there are different levels to start out at, but let’s assume you are just getting started.  And for simplicity let’s focus on the FLW Tour side of the sport.  The first tournament stepping stones for the FLW Tour would be hosted by your local TBF Bass Club and the BFL that have divisions all over the United States.  These are for the most part single-day weekend events. These tournaments can qualify you for regional and national events—ultimately helping you build a name for yourself and win money to invest in larger tournaments.  As an alternative, BASS comparable events are the Bassmaster Weekend Series and BASS Nation tournaments.

Once you succeed in these events, the next level tournaments are the FLW Everstart Series and Bassmaster Opens—these are comparable to Triple A baseball leagues.  Once you succeed at these levels, you can move onto the Tour level or the Majors. This is where the money and time commitment increase, as well as the level of competition.  At the tour level, entry fees and travel expenses can easily exceed $50,000 every year just to play.  Very few anglers do this all with their own money or make a living off tournament winnings alone.

Gain Sponsorship

The second half of the tournament fishing equation is sponsorship and marketing.  To have a long successful career you must be talented and marketing savvy. By combining these assets with your angling skills you’ll be able to form mutually beneficial relationships with sponsoring companies that can assist with tournament entry fees and other expenses along the way.  As part of these sponsorships, when you’re not fishing, you will often write articles and blogs or spend time on the road fulfilling sponsor obligations at sport shows and speaking engagements.

It can be a great life—who wouldn’t want to fish for a living, right?  But behind the fishing tournaments that you see on the television on Sunday afternoon, there is a lot of work and commitment.  If you are passionate about being a tournament angler, my best advice is to start fishing as much as possible!

If you’re interested in becoming a college tournament angler be sure to check out Michaela Anderson’s blog on how to get into the tournament scene.

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

Rich at EverStart Central Division Tournament

Rich at EverStart Central Division Tournament

Jerkbait Spring Fishing: Jerk, Jerk, Pause…

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , on April 29, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

The ice is starting to melt in Minnesota and one of the first baits I am itching to reach for is a suspending jerkbait. Early spring jerkbait fishing used to mean wrapping the hook shanks of my Rapala Original Floaters with lead wire or solder to get them to suspend “just right” in the water. But these days, there are tons of great options right out of the box from Rapala and many other manufacturers.

In my opinion, the Rapala Husky Jerk was one of the first suspending jerkbaits to really get it right. It has proven successful over time, and is a bait that I still use today. The Husky Jerk is great because it has subdued action when twitched and suspending; plus, there are tons of great colors and sizes for just about any situation.

On the other hand of the spectrum, this is the time to take a look at the newer, high-end rip baits from companies like Jackall. Baits like the Squad Minnow and Squirrel jerkbaits have flashy paint jobs and a great rolling action when worked correctly.

No matter which jerkbait I pull from the box, I throw it on a 10-12lb fluorocarbon line. I like light fluorocarbon for two reasons: its sinking properties helps the bait reach a few extra inches in depth, and the lower stretch of fluorocarbon really makes the bait pop when I work it. I always complete my setup with my rod of choice—a Dobyns Champion 704 CB. This has a great tip for making these types of baits dance underwater and has a soft action for fighting bigger fish on light line.

Suspending jerkbaits are a great tool for pulling bass from coldwater, so give them a try from the moment the ice is out until the waters get into the mid- to upper- 50 degree range. While these baits will work year-round, the prime range for jerkbait fishing is during this cold water spring fishing.

With this successful setup, all you need to do is work on your cadence: jerk, jerk, pause…

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

Jerkbait Spring Fishing

Checklist for a Successful Kids Fishing Trip

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , , on April 15, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

There are few things I find more rewarding than taking my girls out on a fishing trip and exposing them to the enjoyment of the outdoors. I think it’s important to get the kids out on the water so that we can spend some time together and they can begin a lifetime of embracing outdoor activities.

When taking kids out fishing, there are a few items I am sure to bring that make the trip more enjoyable for everyone!  A life jacket is crucial–it’s the law and kid’s safety is nothing to fool with.  I also make sure to bring lots of snacks & drinks–no matter how good the fishing is, kids have more fun with snacks.  It’s obvious that you need to bring bait, but regardless of whether the bait is live or artificial, I recommend bringing some small bait in order to target panfish.  I also make sure to pack a camera so that I never miss out on capturing all of the fun. You never know when that picture-perfect moment will arise!  Finally, it’s important to keep an open mind because it’s not always about the fishing–boat rides, swimming or just playing in the boat are all fair game.

Make it more about the experience of being in the outdoors and not always about the catch. When it comes to fishing, remember that most kids would rather catch one hundred little ones than one big one.

Checklist for Kids Fishing Trip

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

Fishing Bedding Bass – Ethical or Not?

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , , on April 10, 2013 by krugerfarms.com
Map from North American Fishing Club (NAFC) article

Map from North American Fishing Club (NAFC) article

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

Here we sit, the first full week in April and the spawning band rapidly shifts north day by day. Which brings up the question: is it ethical to target bedding bass?

Many Northern states have regulations and closed seasons to prevent anglers from fishing for bass during the spawn. Yet, most anglers at one time or another are presented with the opportunity to be on the water when some population of bass is spawning. Many anglers feel it’s unethical or “less sporting” to visually fish for bedding bass, and others find it to be their favorite type of fishing. Is either group right or wrong?

In truth, many anglers who disapprove of bed fishing, probably catch bedding bass while blindly fishing in the spring more often than they know. Also, sometimes sight fishing bass can be tougher than you think. From most of the reading I have done, temporarily removing the occasional bass from a bed and then releasing it will not have any long-term effects on the fishery.  Even if, as a result of your catching a bedding bass, a predator raids the nest or a fish’s normal spawn is interrupted, all bodies of water have a certain carrying capacity for bass, so if one nest is lost, it just increases the odds of others surviving.

That being said, I rarely fish for bedding bass outside of tournaments, except for when I’m offered the rare shot at a trophy class fish. In those rare instances, I take a quick picture and put the bass immediately back into the water. It is important not to harvest large bass during the spawn because their genetics must be passed on in order to create more trophy class fish for years to come.

When I practice visual fishing for bedding bass, I usually fish without hooks just to see what types of lures trigger them best. Also, I try to avoid disturbing bedding areas with a trolling motor or outboard, because stirring up an area with a high density of beds can have a serious impact on a fishery.

So, is fishing bedding bass ethical? I think it can be. You can enjoy the resource and take advantage of this window to potentially catch your biggest fish of the year, but be respectful! Practice, catch, photo and release!

Share what you think in the comments. Is it ethical to fish bedding bass? Have you read information that has helped you decide where you stand on this issue?

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).

Is the New Scatter Rap Worthy of the Hype?

Posted in Fishing Tips with tags , , , , , , , , on March 18, 2013 by krugerfarms.com

Pro-staff Contributor: Rich Lindgren

Every year, we are all inundated with a myriad of new fishing lures, shapes and sizes, some designed to catch anglers and others designed to catch fish. Within these new options each year, theScatter Rap Shadre are always a few true winners in the bunch. As anglers, it’s our job to try to filter through the marketing, packaging and hype to determine ultimately what ends up in our tackle boxes.

Of the new baits launching in 2013, I have to say I am genuinely intrigued by the new Scatter Rap series from Rapala. These items have come with plenty of hype as of late, but that is not always bad, and Rapala has a pretty strong track record of putting out winners that are mainstays in my tackle boxes and most of yours.

The exciting premise of the Scatter Rap is that it has a natural “hunting” or “evasive” action–something anglers are constantly trying to create by running our lures into the bottom, wood, rocks, grass or anything else we can get our crankbaits to make contact with. If it moves as advertised, this new line of baits will wander randomly, simulating this action of baitfish that triggers reaction bites from predator fish.

As a bass angler, I am most anxious to try the Scatter Rap Shads early this spring while the water temps are still in the 40’s to lower 50’s. The original Shad Rap is a known spring time producer for early season bass, so I can only imagine what the new Scatter Shad could do. Once we get past the spawn, my attention is likely to shift toward the Scatter Rap Crank as a mainstay for covering water and catching bass until the late fall!

If you live in Minnesota, come visit krugerfarms.com at the Northwest Sports Show for your chance to be one of the first anglers to get your hands on baits from the Scatter Rap series as well as other great show specials! We will have a limited number of these baits at the show.  If you can’t make it to the show, the Scatter Rap is also available for pre-booking on krugerfarms.com now!

Rich Lindgren is a tournament bass angler living in Lakeville, MN chasing bass all over Minnesota and its adjoining states. Bass blogger, podcaster and fishing promoter. You’ll see him fishing the Minnesota bass tournament scene representing krugerfarms.com and Dobyns Rods among others. You can follow him on Twitter (@HellaBass) and like him on Facebook (facebook.com/bassinblog).